11:00 - 11:20 amSunday, September 29
LK 130
I’ll txt u if I have a problem: how the Société Canadienne du Cancer applied behavior-change theory, data mining and agile to help young adults quit smoking
LK 130
I’ll txt u if I have a problem: how the Société Canadienne du Cancer applied behavior-change theory, data mining and agile to help young adults quit smoking
CEO, Evolution Health Systems
Background Smoking rates are higher among young adults, especially in Quebec where 30% of 18-24 year-olds smoke. In 2010, the Canadian Cancer Society (CCS) Quebec Division launched proof-of-concept (Phase... Read more

Description

Background

Smoking rates are higher among young adults, especially in Quebec where 30% of 18-24 year-olds smoke. In 2010, the Canadian Cancer Society (CCS) Quebec Division launched proof-of-concept (Phase I) project named Service de Messageire Texte pour Arrêter le Tabac (SMAT: http://www.smat.ca), which utilized proactive and reactive text messaging to promote cessation. To ensure the technical sustainability of SMAT, Agile, a software methodology based on iterative and incremental development, was used to architect Phase II (launched in December 2011) and Phase III (launched in March of 2013).

Objectives

The primary objective of SMAT was to test the feasibility of tailored text messaging and live text chat with cessation counselors to help young adults quit smoking. A secondary objective was to test the application of Agile in Phases II and III.

Methods

A phase-based approach and a systematic review of qualitative studies, focus group testing, and traditional project management were utilized in the development of Phase I. Agile, with a particular focus on data analysis, keyword frequency, participant feedback and advice from cessation counselors, was strategically applied to the development and delivery of Phases II and III.

Phase II Results and Phase III Development

There were 994 participants (51% male) in the Phase II study period with 40.5% (n=403) between the ages of 18-24. 42,613 algorithm-based proactive text messages were distributed, 65% (n=646) of participants utilized the reactive keyword service and 1,099 TaChI chats occurred with CCS cessation counselors. 48% (n=477) of TaChI chats were with males. Three month follow-up surveys were distributed to all study participants’ mobile phones. 58% (n=546) responded with 170 (31.1%) indicating cessation, resulting in a self-report intent-to-treat quit rate of 17.1%. Further personalization in Phase III included tailored algorithms for pregnant smokers, quitters with substance abuse problems, mood disorders, students, full-time workers and users who relapse.

Conclusions

Reaching young Quebecers via mobile phones appears to be a viable means to approach treatment. The ability to reach young men is particularly promising. The use of Agile as a methodology facilitated the growth of the intervention based on CCS objectives, as well as feedback from both users and cessation counselors.

Lessons Learned

Emerging technologies are promising, but do not have defined best-practice application to behavioral science. Agile appears to be a viable approach for cross-functional teams with interdisciplinary experts. Due to its iterative nature and relationship to experimental design, Agile appears to be well suited to the continued enhancement of emerging behavioral health technologies.

While working for an eHealth startup during the late 90’s dot-com boom, Trevor realized that the Internet would transform the delivery of healthcare services. Recognizing this potential, in 2000 he founded Evolution Health and focused on bridging traditional, evidence-based healthcare with Internet and mobile-based tools. Through designing algorithmic platforms that transform behavior-based data into tailored treatment protocols, Trevor has become a respected pioneer in online and mobile health behavior change. As CEO he leads the strategic growth of Evolution Health and plays key roles in business development, technology innovation, and data analysis.

Trevor has an Honors Bachelor’s Degree in History and English from the University of Western Ontario, and a Masters of Science in Community Health (MScCH) with a specialization in Addictions and Mental Health from the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. In addition, he has an MBA from the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto and a Global Executive Masters of Business Administration (GEMBA) from the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland. He is currently a Research Associate at Henley Business School, University of Reading, and his doctorate focuses on cost modeling and financial analysis of eHealth and mHealth interventions.

 

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