2:05 - 2:25 pmSaturday, September 28
LK 130
Septris: improving sepsis recognition and management through a mobile educational game
LK 130
Septris: improving sepsis recognition and management through a mobile educational game
Clinical Associate Professor, Stanford University
Background Sepsis is common, deadly, and costly. Over 13 million people worldwide have sepsis each year, and the expected mortality can be as high as 25-50%. In the United States the annual incidence is... Read more

Description

Background

Sepsis is common, deadly, and costly. Over 13 million people worldwide have sepsis each year, and the expected mortality can be as high as 25-50%. In the United States the annual incidence is 750,000, 225,000 die and $13 billion is spent. Sepsis states are often under recognized and sub-optimally managed, presenting opportunity for improvement. The International Surviving Sepsis Campaign has recommended use of evidence based bundles as a strategy to improve sepsis mortality. 

Purpose

Our goal was to create a free interactive mobile case-based online activity to provide an innovative approach to teach early sepsis identification and apply evidence-based management guidelines. This tool, named Septris, could be used as an adjunct to traditional methods for teaching sepsis. 

Description

Since the launch of Septris in November 2011 (http://cme.stanford.edu/septris/), 15,000 have played the game and 2200 have finished the game. Innovative aspects of our game include multiple patients “falling” to their deaths in an interactive case based format with a live scoreboard, pop quizzes, and immediate feedback on choices.

To test learners’ knowledge, 156 Stanford medical students and residents played Septris in June 2012. We administered a 10 question pre-test immediately before playing the Septris game, and a 19 question post-test immediately after playing the Septris game. We evaluated both sepsis knowledge (how to identify sepsis states and manage septic patients) and attitudes (toward sepsis management and the Septris game).

83% of players found Septris enjoyable and would recommend the game to others. The learners’ retrospective self-rating of ability to identify and manage sepsis increased from 2.1 to 3, and 2.1 to 2.8, respectively (1=poor, 5=excellent; n = 156; p < 0.001 for both). Knowledge increased significantly (p < 0.001) from a pre-game score of 6 to a post-game score of 6.9 on a ten question test.

Conclusions

Septris has gained national and international recognition, and thousands have played the game. At Stanford, we have shown that the game improves our medical students' and residents' knowledge in sepsis recognition and management. Future directions include improving the functionality of Septris and expansion of this learning platform to other topics such as surgery decision making.

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