11:40 am - 12:00 pmSunday, September 7
Plenary Hall
Open-source genomic analyses on open-source patients
Plenary Hall
Open-source genomic analyses on open-source patients
Director of Science, DNAnexus
In the traditional health care paradigm, patients are regarded as precious entities whose information is sensitive and highly restricted. This limits the opportunity for diagnosing, or otherwise ‘researching’... Read more

Description

In the traditional health care paradigm, patients are regarded as precious entities whose information is sensitive and highly restricted. This limits the opportunity for diagnosing, or otherwise ‘researching’ or ‘analyzing’ a patient to only the few that happen to have access.
 
Sites like the Personal Genome Project, dedicated to making public genome, health, and trait data available to anyone for the greater good, have popped up in recent years. This has seen the emergence of the “open-source patient” model, where individuals publicly volunteer a vast amount of information about themselves, such as their name and age, their genomic information, as well as information on their conditions.
 
By open-sourcing themselves, patients effectively open the doors to new collaborative models for medical research and medicine. Since their genomic data is readily available (and no other form of approval is required), anybody from interested scientists to genome hobbyists can download and analyze that data.
 
In this talk, we explore the idea of using the DNAnexus platform to perform open-source genomic analyses on open-source patients. Funded by Google Ventures, TPG Biotech, and First Round Capital, DNAnexus is a software technology company that aims to be the online DNA data platform of the future. Using DNAnexus, we combine cloud computing with advance bioinformatics to analyze a real open-source patient.
 
We ultimately entertain the thought of collaborative, crowdsourced online medicine, which may empower patients to go beyond webMD to learn about their health, and potentially disrupt the diagnostic model as it becomes more accessible for individuals to explore their genomes.
 
Originally from a Greek island, George Asimenos has an undergraduate degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the National Technical University of Athens. He then came to sunny California for a PhD in Computer Science at Stanford University, where he got involved in comparative genomics and helped analyze 1% of the human genome as part of the ENCODE Pilot Project. He is currently the Director of Science at DNAnexus, a Stanford-spawned startup backed primarily by Google Ventures.
 
Outside of computation biology, he is a cryptography and security enthusiast, and has received the DEFCON Black Badge award.
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