2:20 - 2:40 pmSaturday, September 6
Plenary Hall
Evaluating the affordances of the iPad for standardized patient encounters during clinical skills exams
Plenary Hall
Evaluating the affordances of the iPad for standardized patient encounters during clinical skills exams
Assistant Clinical Professor, UC Irvine
The iPad has been integrated into the medical school curriculum at the UC Irvine through the iMedEd initative. Accordingly, the iPad has been integrated into the Objective Structured Clinical Examination... Read more

Description

The iPad has been integrated into the medical school curriculum at the UC Irvine through the iMedEd initative. Accordingly, the iPad has been integrated into the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) exam for two third-year clerkships: Pediatrics and Family Medicine. This study seeks to evaluate the affordances of the iPad for the student doctor-standardized patient (SP) encounters during the Family Medicine OSCE exam. Specifically, we would like to analyze the use of a patient education iPad app, drawMD, as well as student and SP perceptions of the iPad and this tool on their encounters.

 Research

Questions

  1. Can the iPad serve as an effective tool to facilitiate students’ encounters with standardized patients during a clinical examination?
  2. Does the ability to create multimedia presentations on the iPad improve the SP experience during OSCE-based encounters?
  3. How do students perceive the affordances of an iPad for clinical examination purposes?

Methods

Third-year medical students enrolled in the Family Medicine clerkship during a six-month period were recruited into this study. Students were provided an orientation to the drawMD patient education tool at the beginning of their rotation. At the end of the clerkship, students participated in an OSCE to assess their clinical skills. During two long stations of the OSCE, medical students were asked to develop a brief patient education presentation using the iPad and drawMD for a return visit scenario. SPs completed a 5-item checklist about the drawMD presentation at the end of each encounter. Students completed a survey about their perceptions of the iPad for patient education and experience using drawMD at the end of the OSCE.

Results

Standardized patients had a positive impression of the iPad patient education presentations. SP checklists (N=61) indicated 39% strongly agreed and 54% agreed that students created an effective patient education presentation using drawMD. Further, 42% strongly agreed and 52% agreed that students improved the SP’s understanding of their medical condition by using drawMD on the iPad. Similarly, medical students found creating a patient education presentation useful for their return visit encounter with the SPs. Survey responses (N=40) revealed that 10% strongly agreed and 70% agreed that drawMD and the iPad helped them in preparation for the return visit. 27.5% strongly agreed and 65% agreed that the drawMD presentation allowed them to better communicate with the SP. In addition, 17.5% strongly disagreed and 65% disagreed that the iPad was a distraction in their preparation for the return visit.

Discussion

This study explored the potential of the iPad to improve the SP experience during OSCE-based encounters and it appears that there is a positive response to the iPad as a patient education tool.  Likewise, students find the iPad a useful in preparing for a patient encounter and to help them communicate better with the SP. As mobile technologies are becoming more readily available and accessible to clinicians, this study supports future research for use of the iPad in patient education. The multimedia capabilities and form factor of mobile devices make them ideal candidates for use towards this end.

Warren Wiechmann is the Associate Dean of Instructional Technologies at the University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine and the project leader for the school’s iMedEd Initiative (www.imeded.uci.edu), a comprehensive digital overhaul of the curriculum which uses the iPad as its centerpiece for curricular innovation.

He is interested in the mash-up of technology, medicine, and education.  He is also intrigued by the integration of technology to improve clinical workflows and efficiency, instructional technology and information design to enhance physician and patient education, mobile and asynchronous learning, the development of a medical student curriculum in informatics and instructional technology, digital literacy, and mHealth/eHealth/Medicine 2.0/Health 2.0.  

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