2:40 - 3:00 pmSaturday, September 6
LK 120
Beyond patient-doctor communication: Moving medicine into the 21st century with public medical communication
LK 120
Beyond patient-doctor communication: Moving medicine into the 21st century with public medical communication
Associate Professor, UCSF
The digital revolution of the last twenty years has created a “new communications ecosystem” and transformed how we learn and communicate. This talk introduces the new skill set and field that have... Read more

Description

The digital revolution of the last twenty years has created a “new communications ecosystem” and transformed how we learn and communicate. This talk introduces the new skill set and field that have emerged within medicine in response these broader societal transformations. Called Public Medical Communication (PMC), it includes writing, speaking and use of social media by health professionals about medicine and health care and expands communication in medicine from clinical encounters and traditional scholarship to essays, op-eds, blogs, tweets, videos and other work that engages the public, policymakers, and colleagues across specialties and health professions.

Until recently the majority of modern-day public conversations about health and health care were conducted by pundits and politicians. This was in part because physicians did not consider participation in conversations beyond the bedside or clinic part of their role. While law and business schools have taught persuasive communication for years, medical schools have considered such skills elective and inessential. Yet, over the last decade, with little fanfare and no collective organization, physicians from both academia and the community have entered the new communications ecosystem. In large and rapidly increasing numbers, they and other health professionals are communicating with each other within and across specialties and with the public, patient communities, health care organizations, and policymakers in ways that simply didn’t exist twenty years ago. These new modes and sectors of communication go beyond traditional forms of communication in medicine to reach larger and more diverse audiences and offer unprecedented opportunities for public education, dialogue, and dissemination of new science and accurate medical information.

Workshops at annual medical meetings, medical centers, and conferences as well as a series of courses at UCSF for medical students and residents on Public Medical Communication consistently earn near perfect scores for educational content and effectiveness and have resulted in blogs, professional social media engagement, and publications in the New York Times, LA Times, Huffington PostHealth Affairs, Annals of Internal Medicine and the New England Journal, among many other journals and papers.

This Prezi-based talk describes Public Medical Communication and offers stories, examples, images and strategies for successfully incorporating this new form of communication into medical education and careers. 

Louise Aronson is a geriatrician, writer, medical educator and Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). She received her MD from Harvard Medical School and her MFA from the Warren Wilson Program for Writers. Currently she holds an Arnold P. Gold Foundation professorship for humanism in medicine, and directs the Northern California Geriatrics Education Center, the UCSF reflective learning curriculum, and UCSF Medical Humanities. Her scholarly work focuses on reflective writing and public medical communication. She has received the California Homecare Physician of the Year award, a Geriatric Academic Career Award, the Cooke Award for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, the Lieberman Scholar Award, the AOA Edward D. Harris Professionalism Award, and numerous awards for her literary writing. Her work has appeared in literary and medical journals and in the lay press, including the New York Times, Narrative Magazine, the New England Journal of Medicine, and the Bellevue Literary Review. Her first book, A History of the Present Illness, was published by Bloomsbury in 2013. Find her at http://louisearonson.com/
or on twitter @louisearonson.

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