11:00 - 11:20 amSunday, September 7
LK 101
Participatory design of pictographs for minority health: Crowdsourcing through gaming
LK 101
Participatory design of pictographs for minority health: Crowdsourcing through gaming
University of Utah
Background Nearly nine out of 10 adults have difficulty using the everyday health information that is routinely available in healthcare facilities, retail outlets, media, and communities. When people... Read more

Description

Background Nearly nine out of 10 adults have difficulty using the everyday health information that is routinely available in healthcare facilities, retail outlets, media, and communities. When people receive accurate, easy-to-use information about a health issue, they are better able to take action to protect and promote their health and wellness. Research shows that adding illustrations to patient instructions can significantly increase comprehension, recall, and adherence. However, creating custom-made pictures is a costly and time-consuming task, which must also take the specific needs of disadvantaged populations into consideration. Studies on the use of pictures in patient education materials often state that the use of inadequate pictures does not necessarily increase comprehension or recall. Pictures are considered inadequate when they do not convey their intended meanings with enough clarity or precision.

In October 2013, we were awarded a three year grant from the National Library of Medicine to develop an online library of health-related pictures that will be populated utilizing a participatory design model. Through gaming and crowdsourcing, health care consumers will assess, create, and revise pictures. Engaging minority groups and disadvantaged populations in the production cycle of the education materials intended for their use increases the likelihood that the information will be relevant to them.  The result will be a free, online picture library that supports patient-centered and culturally sensitive health communication.

Methods The production and testing of the pictures will utilize participatory design and crowdsourcing methods that have proven to be highly successful in other domains, but which have not been used in the creation of patient education materials. Crowdsourcing will be used for the creation and testing of pictures - any participant will be able to propose new pictures, propose improvements or alternatives to existing pictures, and participate in the recognizability testing of the pictures. Testing the recognizability of pictures used in education materials is a challenging endeavor, and the iterative design-test-redesign system is expensive and time-consuming. We will use a gaming approach for the testing of pictures, where participants will try to guess the meaning of the pictures.

Results – In progress In Year 1 of the grant, we conducted focus group meetings with Community Faces of Utah, an organization representing African refugee, African American, Hispanic, American Indian, and Pacific Islander groups in Utah. Forming a partnership with this organization will enable us to ensure a culturally diverse group of crowdsourcing participants. The focus group ascertained the leading health concerns of these communities, their use of technology, and their gaming interests. The grant investigators and Community Faces of Utah representatives then worked with the prestigious Gaming Department from the Entertainments, Arts & Engineering program at the University of Utah to brainstorm the creation of the pictographs game for this grant. Graduate students from the program will be assigned to the project from May – July 2014 to develop the game.  Beta testing will be conducted by September 2014.

Erica Lake joined the faculty at the Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library in 2011 as Associate Director of the Hope Fox Eccles Health Library, the consumer health library for University of Utah Health Care. In this role, Erica ensures that patients, their families, and the general community have access to the services and resources they need to make informed choices about their health care.

Erica earned her MLS from Indiana University, and worked in academic, public, and special libraries, before entering the field of hospital librarianship in 1999. She was Senior Medical Librarian at Intermountain Healthcare for 11 years, where she worked to increase clinical access to evidence-based information, and played a leadership role in coordinating corporate-wide availability of electronic biomedical resources. In 2004, she received the Barbara McDowell Award for Excellence in Hospital Librarianship from the Midcontinental Chapter of the Medical Library Association. Erica thoroughly loves her profession, and receives great satisfaction knowing she contributes to improved patient care.

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