1:20 - 2:05 pmSunday, September 27
Plenary Hall
Clinical research in the palm of your hand: Smart phone apps for patient-centered research
Plenary Hall
Clinical research in the palm of your hand: Smart phone apps for patient-centered research
Stanford University
Sage Bionetworks
Mount Sinai Hospital
Today’s mobile phones (especially smartphones) are becoming powerful platforms for communicating, computing and sensing.  Mobile health “apps” have generated great interest as a means to improve... Read more

Description

Today’s mobile phones (especially smartphones) are becoming powerful platforms for communicating, computing and sensing.  Mobile health “apps” have generated great interest as a means to improve self-tracking in health and disease. At the same time, smartphones can also enable new paradigms in clinical research. Potential benefits of smartphone-facilitated clinical research include longitudinal, more continuous data collection; novel phenotyping through passive and active measurements; access to a broader, more geographically distributed pool of participants; and using communication tools to foster participant engagement. Equally important, smartphone apps can help participants benefit from their own study data to an unprecedented extent, and contribute to a new culture of clinical research participation that is more centered on participants. This panel includes leaders from academic medicine and industry to discuss recent momentum in smartphone-based clinical research.

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Karan leads customer development and sales at Ginger.io. He has experience across the healthcare ecosystem working at Humedica, Signal Point Partners, and ZS Associates. He recently earned his MBA from MIT Sloan and a fellowship from the MIT Legatum Center. He is currently on leave from the Harvard-MIT Health Science Technology program. Karan received his B.A. and B.S. in Economics and Business Administration from UC Berkeley.

Stanley Y. Shaw, MD PhD is one of the founding faculty members in the Center for Systems Biology at Massachusetts General Hospital, an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School, and an Associate Member of the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT. He is Co-founder and Co-Director of the MGH Center for Assessment Technology and Continuous Health (CATCH), which develops quantitative phenotypes, digital health tools, and integrative analytics for patient care and biomedical discovery. His laboratory studies human phenotyping at many levels, from nanoparticle molecular imaging, to systems biology analysis on patient cells, to data mining and analytics using patient Electronic Medical Records.

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