11:10 am - 12:10 pmThursday, September 24
Quadrus Anteroom
Learning Lab on The case for Google Glass and first-person video in medical education
Quadrus Anteroom
Learning Lab on The case for Google Glass and first-person video in medical education
Assistant Clinical Professor, UC Irvine
The use of video in medical education is not new or unique — from lecture capture, studio production, to fixed-camera recordings of Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs). “Action cameras”... Read more

Description

The use of video in medical education is not new or unique — from lecture capture, studio production, to fixed-camera recordings of Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs). “Action cameras” like the GoPro Hero and the development of optical head-mounted displays such as Google Glass have made it easy to capture first-person point-of-view footage. Early adopters of these technologies such as Drs. Rafael Grossmann, Pedro Guillen, Homero Rivas, and Pierre Theodore have developed compelling use cases.

Despite the relative commercial failure of Google Glass as a consumer project, there is still strong interest in its use as an adjunct in medicine and healthcare. As the number of specific healthcare use-cases continue to climb and the number of healthcare-focused Glass software providers grows, more and more institutions are starting to consider piloting Google Glass. The three main deployment areas for Glass include data manipulation (EMR integration, checklists), video/photo documentation (for assessment, teaching, or for the EMR), and video communication (telemedicine or teleconsults). Beyond the issues of end-user adoption and the actual usage of the device, there are well-documented concerns from different stakeholders across the healthcare institution.

At UC Irvine, we launched an ambitious Google Glass pilot with 10 units with planned use cases for the basic and clinical sciences experiences. After a number of small experiments with Google Glass, we have developed and reiterated upon the following primary use cases – as an assessment tool of student procedural competence during their OSCE, as an assessment tool for resident procedural competency, a communication/streaming tool that connects healthcare partners at a distnace. and as a feedback tool for students to see themselves “through a patient’s eyes.”

This 60-minute will focus on these primary use cases and the pilot data that we have gathered to date. We will share and discuss other areas for implementation into a medical, nursing, or resident curriculum. The discussion will highlight Google Glass, but dedicated time will be spent highlighting dedicated strengths and weakness of other first-person recording devices such as GoPro. Finally, we plan to share the logistics of our hospital approval process, HIPAA consent and data security clearances, and other lessons learned about the technology.

Expected Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will learn about specific use-cases and case-studies of Google Glass implementations in clinical and teaching environments
  • Participants will learn about barriers to implementation of new technologies and strategies to overcome them
  • Participants will be able to build a framework for assessing other emerging technologies in their institutions

Describe the Anticipated Audience Participation: The audience will receive discussion points based on the case-studies described by the panel. They will be encouraged to discuss amongst smaller groups and share their institutional perspectives on the points, and then share back with the larger group.

Warren Wiechmann is the Associate Dean of Instructional Technologies at the University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine and the project leader for the school’s iMedEd Initiative (www.imeded.uci.edu), a comprehensive digital overhaul of the curriculum which uses the iPad as its centerpiece for curricular innovation.

He is interested in the mash-up of technology, medicine, and education.  He is also intrigued by the integration of technology to improve clinical workflows and efficiency, instructional technology and information design to enhance physician and patient education, mobile and asynchronous learning, the development of a medical student curriculum in informatics and instructional technology, digital literacy, and mHealth/eHealth/Medicine 2.0/Health 2.0.  

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