12:05 - 1:35 pmSaturday, September 26
LK 304
Workshop: Is Sweden Creating the IKEA for Health?
LK 304
Workshop: Is Sweden Creating the IKEA for Health?
Self-tracking ePatient and PhD candidate, Karolinska Institute
Sweden is known around the world for IKEA, the Nobel Prize and social welfare. The Swedish government has taken a clear position in the area of e-health and the future of connected healthcare. In this... Read more

Description

Sweden is known around the world for IKEA, the Nobel Prize and social welfare. The Swedish government has taken a clear position in the area of e-health and the future of connected healthcare. In this workshop we will present a number of ongoing Swedish projects and initiatives with one common goal: enabling patients and citizens to take a more active role in managing their own health. The aim is to optimize patient work, particularly in care processes relating to chronical diseases.  

What are the obstacles on the road to e-health accessible to all? Is it possible to create an IKEA for health?

Sweden has a national e-health portal for all citizens, My Healthcare Contacts ("Mina vårdkontakter"), enabling secure login to any healthcare service in the country. Sweden is planning to make online access to full electronic medical records available to all citizens by 2017. And through the initiative My Care Pathways ("Mina vårdflöden") patients will be able to follow and manage their care processes online.

We are building a national infrastructure for e-health, from a patient perspective; this work is so to say  - a bumpy road.

Each healthcare provider has a high degree of autonomy, which means that ensuring the same level of service throughout the country is difficult. The development of patient access to online healthcare records has met both legal and organizational challenges. And Sweden has not been spared when it comes to challenges with health IT-systems’ interoperability, i.e. the installed base is spaghetti bowl integrations.

Meanwhile, there is a genuine desire to improve the situation. The project The Daily Patient ("Dagens patient") has attracted attention for exploring the effects of active patient work, i.e. selfcare for people with chronic diseases, and doing so by not only consulting patients but also involving them beyond the boundaries of healthcare. Groups of people with Parkinson's disease and Multiple Sclerosis are supported in learning about their individual disease through self-tracking. The Swedish National platform will also be further developed to make health related data securely available for development of innovative e-services both within and outside healthcare organizations. The platform will open up for e.g. patient organizations, third party health app developers or even individual patients to design e-services that can provide access to health related data.

In this workshop you will meet patients, researchers, platform architectures, service providers, and entrepreneurs, all with hands on experience in developing the future of Swedish healthcare. 

We hope you will join us for a lively session!

Sara Riggare is an engineer and an unusually engaged patient. She was diagnosed with early-onset Parkinson’s Disease in 2003 when she was just 32. After learning she had Parkinson’s, Sara used her engineering and passion for measurement to better understand her disease.

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