2:40 - 4:10 pmThursday, September 24
Deck C
The future of medical training in simulation
Deck C
The future of medical training in simulation
Johns Hopkins University
The benefits of deliberate practice are well established in many professional domains and it has been proven that it is a more powerful predictor of professional competence than experience alone. Various... Read more

Description

The benefits of deliberate practice are well established in many professional domains and it has been proven that it is a more powerful predictor of professional competence than experience alone. Various studies in medicine have also confirmed its effectiveness in medical education. However, limited time and case-volume have reduced such opportunity in real life settings. Patient safety is also a priority that led to training on cadavers and animal models; however cost and ethical issues related to them are diminishing those options as well. In the meantime, as a result of technological advancements, simulation has evolved as a cornerstone training modality that focuses on attaining professional competency without jeopardizing patient care. Studies have also shown the transfer of these skills from laboratory to the real-life settings. As simulation allows an opportunity for deliberate practice and provision of automated and precise feedback, it allows constant skill improvement, and not just skill acquisition in a relatively shorter amount of time. Despite these unequivocal benefits, simulation based medical training is not yet fully incorporated in medicine, mainly due to the cost and fidelity related issues. These barriers can be overcome by developing single simulation centers by multiple institutions and also advancing and developing simulation technology that can be used as apps on mobile devices.

 

The objectives of this workshop are the following:

  1. To increase awareness of simulation in medicine and its benefits
  2. To understand the challenges faced by simulation
  3. To understand different models of simulation
  4. How simulation can be made cost-effective and incorporated into mainstream medical curriculum.
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