10:10 - 10:55 amSaturday, September 17
LK 102
The successful integration of spiritual competencies within the university level medical education environment
LK 102
The successful integration of spiritual competencies within the university level medical education environment
Christian Science, Health Columnist
Institute of Noetic Sciences
UCB-UCSF Joint Medical Program
Rising Phoenix Integrative Medicine Center
Stanford Health Care
Last year a med student from Stanford University presented an impassioned plea to an international group of health care professionals gathered for the 2015 Medicine X | Ed conference. Her desire was for... Read more

Description

Last year a med student from Stanford University presented an impassioned plea to an international group of health care professionals gathered for the 2015 Medicine X | Ed conference. Her desire was for medical schools to incorporate a broader spectrum of subjects into their required curriculum, including some of the non-medical courses she had taken that she felt helped her to relate to her patients in beneficial ways. Unfortunately, she had to schedule these courses over and above her already heavy course load. For her the disconnect between what she knew her patients wanted and needed and the limited and limiting focus of her required training was obvious.

As it turns out, it’s not just med students but practicing MDs, nurses and other health care workers alike who are beginning to recognize the unique role they have to play in addressing the complexities of their patients’ life circumstances, the pressures they live with, their fears, even their capacity to maintain a sense of purpose and meaning during times of crisis, including end-of-life situations. Although tending to such spiritual needs has long been considered the exclusive purview of chaplains and clergy, studies confirm that there is both the demand and the opportunity for this responsibility to be shared by the medical professionals involved with the day-to-day care of patients.

It seems appropriate, then, for one of the world’s premier patient-centered medical conferences to explore this topic more deeply by convening a panel of uniquely qualified, medically trained individuals to speak on the subject.

I write a weekly column called “Consciousness and Health” that has appeared on a number of national media web sites including The Washington Times, The Washington Post, The Houston Chronicle and American Public Media's "On Being” blog. I also serve as the media and legislative spokesperson for Christian Science in Northern California, love to ride my bike, and am more than happy to chat with anyone, anytime, about baseball. You can find me at norcalcs.org or on Twitter @norcalcs.

After many years of teaching literature, writing, and
medical humanities to undergraduates and leading workshops on poetry in medicine, Marilyn is now part-time professor of
medical humanities at the UCB-UCSF Joint Medical Program, She leads writing workshops, and lectures widely on writing and healing, approaches to life narratives, and writing, spirituality, and health.  She is a hospice volunteer.  Her book Caring for Words in a Culture of Lies
explores strategies of language stewardship. Other recent books include  A Faithful
Farewell
and A Long Letting Go --
reflections for people who are dying and for their caregivers.  A new book, Word by Word, will be out later this
year.  

Dr.
Cantwell is Board-Certified in Pediatrics with post-graduate training
including Fellowships in Pediatric Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine,
a Masters in Public Health, and service with the CDC in Atlanta, GA.

His
holistic medicine credentials include Lead Physician at the Institute for
Health and Healing Clinic in San Francisco, CA (1998-2013), current practice at
Rising Phoenix Integrative Medicine Center in San Francisco, CA, and service on
the first National Advisory Council for the National Center for Complementary
and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) of the NIH in Bethesda, MD (1999-2003).

He is
the author of the multi-award winning book, Map of the Spirit: Diagnosis and
Treatment of the Spirit
.     

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