12:40 - 1:00 pmSaturday, September 17
LK 101
When is technology better than a human? Designing for honest disclosure, confidence, and action
LK 101
When is technology better than a human? Designing for honest disclosure, confidence, and action
Executive Director of Patient Engagement, Emmi
While clinicians and patients work to develop relationships during their usually too-brief encounters, a number of factors impede productive communication: power dynamics, impression management, feelings... Read more

Description

While clinicians and patients work to develop relationships during their usually too-brief encounters, a number of factors impede productive communication: power dynamics, impression management, feelings of shame, judgment and embarrassment, and challenging topics that can make both sides uncomfortable. Consider the interaction around planning for a life-limiting prognosis, discussing frightening risks of a procedure, encouraging someone to quit smoking, asking about depression or potential socio-economic challenges, or yes, a patient’s sex life.

Research shows people are less likely to express strong emotions in front of a clinician; they put on a good face and don’t want to be seen as weak, deeply upset, or unable to change. Stress also creates attentional narrowing, making it hard for people to focus, reason, and remember. And clinicians engage in impression management, too — wanting to be seen as intelligent, knowledgeable, and thoughtful.

Interestingly, research reveals we are more likely to honestly disclose information, including strong emotions, in a virtual setting. Even when we know our answers are ultimately going to a clinician or another human, we experience a sense of privacy. People say their responses seem to disappear into the computer.

This session will look at how multimedia programs and interactive voice response (IVR) phone calls can leverage design to help address stress and strong emotions, and capitalize on the existing benefits of a virtual setting.

Hear how Voice User Interface (VUI) designers use A/B tests examine how subtle psycholinguistic changes and differences in appeals (like an appeal to altruism) can affect intention to get vaccinated or help people to report on sensitive topics like depression, self-harm or substance abuse. The design of these calls take advantage of intention and momentum to help people take action and schedule screenings for things like colorectal cancer or diabetes eye exams.

Likewise, multimedia designers work with patients and families to better design content that reduces anxiety about an upcoming procedure, or boosts confidence to make a smoking cessation attempt, or helps them make and act on a decision to fill out advance directives.

Moving beyond these one-time events, how can we design interactions that extend over time to guide people through transitions from hospital to home? Find out how series of IVR calls and multimedia programs are being designed to help people engage in their care, feel cared for, report key indicators, and experience better health.

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