11:20 - 11:40 amSunday, September 18
LK 120
Creating movement in a health care organization through patient mobilization
LK 120
Creating movement in a health care organization through patient mobilization
Online Community and Digital Experience
ePatient Sarah Kucharski summed up a core theme of last year’s Medicine X when she chanted, “I command changes in corporate philosophy that facilitate collaboration between pharma and patients. See... Read more

Description

ePatient Sarah Kucharski summed up a core theme of last year’s Medicine X when she chanted, “I command changes in corporate philosophy that facilitate collaboration between pharma and patients. See me, hear me, feel me, and include me. We must find ways to work together. Even though it will not be easy.” We heard it loud and clear: relationships matter—patient-to-patient relationships and relationships between organizations and patients.

We’ve heard, and understand, why patient communities are important to patients. In this talk, we’ll shift the focus to why and how patient communities are helpful for organizations. We’ll dive into the value of patient communities and what patient engagement looks like in practice with examples of initiatives by organizations like Oticon Medical and Eli Lilly.

Today, patients empower themselves by meeting others and finding information online. Less time with doctors and more investment in personal health care drives that desire more than ever. Organizations see the need to play a role in this connection, community and information sharing, but can become paralyzed by process and an unclear understanding of how it helps further business objectives.

As Jack Whelan said, “Business processes that have served this industry are so entrenched throughout that we fail to recognize their shortcomings. It’s no secret this industry has become risk averse, reluctant to change and often gives its business processes priority over science.”

Patients who practice self-disclosure and who have made it their own personal mission to inform others can help organizations overcome that paralysis. Understanding how to engage and create meaningful relationships—and most of all how to mobilize those relationships—can become access to otherwise closed conversations.

For organizations, patient communities serve the purpose of becoming more patient-centric, but these communities can also make a significant business impact. Organizations have the opportunity to connect advocates to patients, which gives organizations the opportunity to empower people to share messages in a much more casual, informal way. People trust other people more than companies, and they want to get as close as possible to understanding what to expect from a product or process. Patient communities help people get there. Listening and observing conversations in patient communities helps companies create content that really moves people through the journey and/or decision process. These conversations take the guessing out of content creation—topics, questions, what will provide value—which is time consuming and costly. Communities act as built in R&D for organizations by helping to inform what’s next.

For example, Oticon Medical, the company pioneering bone anchored hearing implant technology, needed to prioritize a number of new products for development, FDA approval and marketing. By creating a closed community for patient-to-patient discussions, Oticon Medical saw that current bone anchored hearing system users were finding many people who also wanted the device, but had an abutment that wouldn’t allow for use of Oticon Medical’s system. With that patient data in hand, Oticon Medical pushed the release of their abutment extender product. Today, the community has done most of the marketing for the new product, which has greatly increased interest and sales.

We’ll also cover brass tacks, like:

  • How to use technology to be a MORE human-centered company
  • How and why connection needs context
  • Why professionals want patient-centered content too

We’ll dive into a 6-step engagement process that organization can utilize to build and use patient communities to move their organizations into the present and future—with each step showing live examples.

Liz Presson leads digital media and community strategy at Oticon Medical, the company pioneering hearing implant technology. Over the last three years, she’s built an online community and digital presence with a following of more than 20,000 passionate community members and advocates. She’s worked with the team at Oticon Medical to empower advocates who act as real-time content creators and inbound marketers for the business. Oticon Medical has received recognition for its digital media initiatives from one of the world’s most admired social media and technology influencers, Guy Kawasaki. Liz’s articles on digital media and technology have been published in Fast Company, Forbes, Mashable, Yahoo and others.

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