2:40 - 2:45 pmSaturday, September 17
Upper Lobby
Women, wellness, and technology: 3 key insights From SSW inspire new opportunities for well-tech
Upper Lobby
Women, wellness, and technology: 3 key insights From SSW inspire new opportunities for well-tech
VP, Engagement Strategy at Saatchi & Saatchi Wellness
By 2018, an incredible 3.6 billion people will have access to the internet, and many will gain access from mobile and wearable devices. According to Rock Health’s 2015 Digital Health Funding report,... Read more

Description

By 2018, an incredible 3.6 billion people will have access to the internet, and many will gain access from mobile and wearable devices. According to Rock Health’s 2015 Digital Health Funding report, the healthcare consumer engagement and personal health tools and tracking categories were their fastest-growing categories in 2015, up 222% year-over-year, and accounted for 23% of overall funding. The opportunities this rapid category adoption poses for both consumers and brands are exciting to say the least.

In early 2014, however, we noticed that women lagged behind men as early adopters of wearable technology. While sales have since reached gender parity, the initial gap sparked a hypothesis: The wearable technologies currently on the market don’t yet meet the broad range of women’s needs when it comes to wellness.

As advocates and specialists in women’s health, the engagement strategy team at SSW led a multi-phased research project to understand not just how women use wellness technology, but also how they perceive wellness and set wellness goals for themselves. We connected with close to 200 women across a range of demographic and geographic backgrounds between August 2014 and May 2015.

Our research uncovered a dichotomy between what women ask of tech and its potential, driven by how women perceive wellness, the central role of social relationships in their wellbeing, and their emotional relationship with technology. These findings not only validate our hypothesis, but also more importantly indicate that women won’t be the ones asking for their needs to be met. It’s up to the industry to design what women can’t yet imagine and convince them of the positive impact new types of well-tech could have beyond simple tracking.

Conclusions from our key findings into 3 categories:

  1. Defining wellness and setting goals
  2. The integral role of social relationships
  3. The well-tech dichotomy

For the first time, we’ll present the full findings and insights from the study as well as share any new learnings in October 2016.

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