2:30 - 4:00 pmSaturday, September 17
Lower Lobby
Point of care ultrasound global: resource limited and resourced environments
Lower Lobby
Point of care ultrasound global: resource limited and resourced environments
University of Colorado
In 2012 the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) released the Emergency Medicine (EM) Milestones. One of the 23 EM milestones... Read more

Description

In 2012 the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) released the Emergency Medicine (EM) Milestones. One of the 23 EM milestones specifically identifies emergency or point of care (POC) ultrasound as a sub competency for trainee education and clinical practice. POC ultrasound can be traced as a development from early clinician based ultrasound in Cardiology and Obstetrics-Gynecology to the present in Emergency Medicine, Critical Care Medicine and Hospitalist Medicine. Point-of-Care ultrasound had much of its early success in the United States in county emergency departments and resource limited settings, such as rural clinics.

Similarly, POC ultrasound has historically been one of few options for care requiring diagnostic imaging in the developing world and in otherwise resource limited environments such as the Thailand tsunami, the Haiti earthquake and other humanitarian emergency situations. In the most or least developed contexts, POC ultrasound is proven to advance the quality and provision of safe and efficient health care.

Leaders in the POC ultrasound community have been the innovative educators in their residency programs, developing fellowships for later stage trainees.

Increasingly, these same leaders are disrupting traditional undergraduate medical education curricula across this country’s medical schools. Students are learning anatomy and physiology using POC ultrasound in cadaver laboratories. They perform cardiac examinations with the stethoscope, simultaneous with performing a hand-held POC ultrasound examination. Even POC ultrasound courses for undergraduate and pre-health students have been developed. The panel will discuss the past present and future for POC ultrasound in resource limited as well as resourced environments. They will focus on trends in medical education such as flipped classroom and just-in time learning. These education methods have allowed POC ultrasound to change the way students of all levels are learning and integrating technology. The panel will focus on trends in global health in the use of POC ultrasound. Moreover, they will focus on future trends of the technology and its permanent role in patient care and health.

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